Forchuk, Menon tapped for CAHS Fellowship by peers

Crystal Mackay // Special to Western News

Western researchers Cheryl Forchuk and Ravi Menon were recognized last week by their peers as fellows of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS) at the CAHS 2015 Forum and Annual General Meeting in Ottawa. The CAHS Fellowship recognizes the pair’s international leadership and significant contributions that have meaningfully advanced the academic health sciences.

Western researcher Cheryl Forchuk was recognized as a fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS) last week at the CAHS 2015 Forum and Annual General Meeting in Ottawa.

Special to Western NewsWestern researcher Cheryl Forchuk was recognized as a fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS) last week at the CAHS 2015 Forum and Annual General Meeting in Ottawa.

Forchuk, a Nursing professor, has published on many topics in relation to mental health and mental illness, including therapeutic relationships, transitional discharge, housing/homelessness, peer support, poverty and nursing theory. She has published a book through Sage on Peplau’s interpersonal theory of nursing, and a book through Canadian Scholar’s Press on housing and homeless issues for psychiatric survivors.

Her current research includes exploring issues related to poverty and social inclusion for psychiatric survivors, housing/homeless issues, the implementation of the Transitional Discharge Model for the transition from hospital to community, and the use of new technologies to improve mental health, including addiction, services.

Forchuk is also a scientist and Assistant Director at Lawson Health Research Institute and is the group leader for mental health/health outcomes research.

Menon, a Medical Biophysics professor, is a pioneer in the field of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and has contributed to the use of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods in neurology and neuroscience for more than three decades. Working with neuroscientists at Western and around the world, he has made numerous contributions to understanding brain function, with papers in journals such as Science, Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Neuron and other high impact and specialist journals. Menon has more than 160 publications and 13,000 citations.

Western researcher Ravi Menon was recognized as a fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS) last week at the CAHS 2015 Forum and Annual General Meeting in Ottawa.

Special to Western NewsWestern researcher Ravi Menon was recognized as a fellow of the Canadian Academy of Health Sciences (CAHS) last week at the CAHS 2015 Forum and Annual General Meeting in Ottawa.

“I am most proud of having put together a unique MRI research facility in Canada, and particularly having assembled a brilliant and loyal staff to keep it all together, giving me the opportunity to further research in this field, nationally and internationally,” he said. “Since I was a junior faculty member, I have had great advocates in top leadership positions who have given me the opportunity to shape the neuroscience agenda in Canada through advisory roles at Canadian Health Research Institute and at various federal and provincial levels.”

Menon is Director of the Centre for Functional and Metabolic Mapping at Robarts Research Institute and Canada Research Chair in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging.