History
25 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall

25 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall

In August 1961, the Berlin Wall was erected, thereby dividing overnight a city and dueling ideologies for the next 28 years. On Nov. 9, 1989, the world watched as jubilant crowds gathered to celebrate its crumbling. To commemorate the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, five Western scholars reflect on that moment’s meaning.

Priestman: Reflecting on me, my Wall and I

Priestman: Reflecting on me, my Wall and I

On Aug. 13, 1961, the Berlin Wall was erected, thereby dividing overnight a city, families and dueling ideologies for the next 28 years. On Nov. 9, 1989, the world watched as jubilant crowds gathered on both sides of that Wall to celebrate the opening of its...

Nathans: Fall reminded world of power of peaceful protest

Nathans: Fall reminded world of power of peaceful protest

On Aug. 13, 1961, the Berlin Wall was erected, thereby dividing overnight a city, families and dueling ideologies for the next 28 years. On Nov. 9, 1989, the world watched as jubilant crowds gathered on both sides of that Wall to celebrate the opening of its...

Dyczok: Rising up in a far different world

Dyczok: Rising up in a far different world

On Aug. 13, 1961, the Berlin Wall was erected, thereby dividing overnight a city, families and dueling ideologies for the next 28 years. On Nov. 9, 1989, the world watched as jubilant crowds gathered on both sides of that Wall to celebrate the opening of its...

Dyczok: Cutting through Ukraine information and disinformation

Ruslana, a Ukrainian pop star-turned-activist, sat facing Wolf Blitzer in CNN’s Situation Room. She had spent three months in Kiev’s Independence Square, Maidan Nezalezhnosti, singing and making speeches in support of Ukraine’s right to democracy and free speech. In the middle of the night on Dec. 10, when riot police attacked the unarmed protesters, her voice could be heard from the stage and live streaming on television, calling out: “Wake up, anyone who can hear me, come out and help.”

Dyczok: Struggling to inform the world

‘Excuse me, who are you and why are you here?’ Ukrainian Public Radio correspondent Andriy Kulykov asked a group of heavily armed men in unmarked uniforms near a military base in Perevalne, Crimea. He received no response.

Emerson’s book wins top Scottish History prize

Western History professor emeritus Roger L. Emerson has been named the winner of the 2013 Saltire Literary Award, Scottish History Book of the Year. The Saltire Society, dedicated to the preservation and furtherance of Scottish culture, announced the award on Nov. 14.

Campus Digest: Rocket fizzles before launch

The London Rocket, a new student-run start-up originally set to operate a low-cost bus service to students travelling from Western to the Greater Toronto Area during the winter exam period, has been forced to shut down due to a legal dispute initiated by Greyhound Canada.

Campus Digest: Dean, alumnae named among influential women

Richard Ivey School of Business Dean Carol Stephenson, along with five Western alumnae, have been named among Canada’s most influential women, according to Women of Influence Magazine in the Canadian publication’s 2nd annual Top 25 Women of Influence list, released in its Winter 2012 issue.

Dean, alumnae named among most influential women

Dean, alumnae named among most influential women

Richard Ivey School of Business Dean Carol Stephenson, along with five Western alumnae, have been named among Canada’s most influential women, according to Women of Influence Magazine.

Snapshot from past holds new meaning for family

It was almost 23 years ago to the day. David Start had his 3-year-old daughter Virginia on his shoulder; 6-year-old sister Mary Beth was holding dad’s hand. The two, sporting matching dresses, strolled through campus with their dad following the graduation of their mother Susan in 1989.

Campus Digest: ‘Soup’er job

At 17, Stacey Blois began working as a part-time cook at Western. Fourteen years later, and now a unit chef at Perth Hall, Blois’ skills have blossomed to the point where she’s heading to the finals of the 3rd annual Toronto Ocean Wise Chowder Chowdown this November.

Western researchers resurrect legacy

Western researchers resurrect legacy

Although he spent a career bringing stories to the masses, Ivan Sytin’s own story might have been lost to history if not for a Western professor emeritus and a PhD alumna.

App brings War of 1812 to life

It’s been 200 years since the War of 1812 erupted, a nearly three-year engagement, at times, fought throughout southern Ontario. Now, a guide to all that history can rest in the palm of your hand.

Ambassador addresses ‘dilemma of NATO enlargement’

Ambassador addresses ‘dilemma of NATO enlargement’

With the Republic of Macedonia’s pending accession to NATO, Canada should stand up as a strong supporter of the Balkan nation, said Ambassador Ljuben Tevdovski, who visits Western’s campus this week.

Reimaging Anita Hill: Finding strength in her story

Reimaging Anita Hill: Finding strength in her story

Anita Hill’s story didn’t end in 1991. But it didn’t begin there either. Hill will deliver her Centre for American Studies Speakers’ Series lecture at 5 p.m. today in Conron Hall, University College, Room 224.

Website documents world wars

Website documents world wars

A website launched by Western University and King’s University College is believed to be the first to document popular culture artifacts and ephemera from the First and Second World Wars.

Immigration defines Canada, not just its politics

At the height of the recent provincial election, the nation’s economic struggles were at the forefront of debate. When an ‘Us vs. Them’ mentality began to rear its head, one student couldn’t help but notice its impact on Canada’s longstanding multicultural identity.