Aniruddho Chokroborty-Hoque
Research details education’s role in independence fight

Research details education’s role in independence fight

For nearly 15 years, Anthropology professor Randa Farah has tracked the Sahrawi people of the Western Sahara, often living among them for months at a time to better understand their lives and struggle for independence.

Researcher looking to re-frame Detroit images

Researcher looking to re-frame Detroit images

Earlier this summer, Visual Arts graduate student Jessica Cappuccitti curated an exhibition, Welcome to Detroit: Suzy Lake and Orlando Ford, at the McIntosh Gallery. The exhibition offered viewers an opportunity to understand how these images – some of Detroit’s decay and others that capture people with smiling faces and open arms – shape ideas about the city.

Research looking for love in all the right data

Research looking for love in all the right data

Love lies broken in Lorne Campbell’s office. It has been deconstructed into thousands of data points on Excel sheets and transformed into code that coldly blinks from a computer screen.

Labour laws historically out of tune with musicians

Labour laws historically out of tune with musicians

Matt Stahl, a Faculty of Information & Media Studies professor, traces the origins of how labour laws have historically been used to exploit the careers of numerous female musicians, His work helps scholars and students of music better understand the role of law in the music industry.

What tell-all crime reporting says about us

What tell-all crime reporting says about us

While researching crime reporting across the globe, Faculty of Information & Media Studies professor Romayne Smith Fullerton found North American media coverage of crime differed significantly from that of European news outlets.

Book finds solution in cooperation, conversation

Book finds solution in cooperation, conversation

As in many towns, there’s a skateboarding park in Teslin, Yukon, where children and teenagers play. The one in Teslin, however, was jointly built by the Teslin Tinglit Council – a Yukon First Nation government – and the municipality.

Study: School cliques don’t always click

Study: School cliques don’t always click

Psychology professor Lynne Zarbatany, along with colleagues, are exploring how peer groups of children shape the behaviour and personality of each individual member of the group.

Climate change clues rest in taking London’s temperature

Climate change clues rest in taking London’s temperature

Temperature research from Geography professor James Voogt will identify ‘hot spots’ city planners and politicians can focus on in designing strategies to reduce temperature – planting trees or increasing the surface reflectivity, for example.

Following flow of ideas reveals mass media roots

Following flow of ideas reveals mass media roots

No matter if making connections across the centuries, or just around the corner, Genevieve de Viveiros’ exploration of a 19th-Century French novelist has led to 21st-Century insights about the spread of ideas and the place of her community in the world.

Music educator: Arts, music need political champions

Music educator: Arts, music need political champions

The plight of music teachers has fallen on Ontario politicians’ tone deaf ears, a Western Music professor contends. Despite ongoing public discussion about the importance of music education, many Ontario public school students will never get to experience the joy of...

Researcher: Activism changing museums for better

Researcher: Activism changing museums for better

For years, Canadian Indigenous communities were allowed little say in how their cultural representations – artifacts and paintings, for example – were displayed in the country’s museums.

Singers urged to be kind to their inner voice

Singers urged to be kind to their inner voice

Opera singer Bethany Hynes, a Don Wright Faculty of Music graduate student, asks her peers a simple question: what does your voice mean to you? “Singers think about their voice a lot – how they function, how they sound and what it says about them as people,” she says....

Researchers analyze peace with computer science

Researchers analyze peace with computer science

Words can play a critical role in turning dreams of peace into reality. Researchers at Western have found this is particularly true for victims of the Colombian conflict, which ended in 2016 when the government and the country’s largest insurgent group, the...

Rediscovering Mexican art, one historical painting at a time

Rediscovering Mexican art, one historical painting at a time

It has taken almost three centuries for Mexican painter Antonio Enríquez to capture the world’s attention. Until now, his paintings of 18th-Century Mexico have languished, forgotten, in places all across Guadalajara, the United States and Spain. His works have been...

Revitalizing Indigenous Education and redefining scholarship

Revitalizing Indigenous Education and redefining scholarship

Education is considered to be one of the most potent tools to improve the lives of young Indigenous peoples in Canada. And its work remains unfinished, according to one Western researcher. More than half of Canada’s youngest and fastest-growing population hasn’t...

Reading reflects key chapters in seniors’ lives

Reading reflects key chapters in seniors’ lives

Dog-eared pages, stacks of magazines and a worn library card can all represent the rich relationship senior Canadians have with their books. And Faculty of Information & Media Studies professor Paulette Rothbauer is using these representations to help change...